Cap’n Bill

Ask Vance

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Hartoon time

As a little boy in Memphis I tremember Mr. Killebrew hosted a tv show,I think it was hartoon time where viewers would send in requests of song titles for Mr. K to draw. The idea was to stump hom on live tv. If a viewer sent in a title say "Man on the Flying Trapeze" the music would begin and that blank piece of paper would appear and after a few seconds of thought Bill would begin to draw a picture of the man on the flying trapeze. Very rarely would a song come along that he could think of nothing to draw. That was the fun part waiting to see if he would have to give up on live tv.

William R.Livesay (Jacksonville,Fl. age 77) 62 days ago

bill killebrew

My mom handed down a drawing of my great grandfather drawn by Bill killebrew. I have always admired the drawing. My great grandfather, pa, died when I about 6, the age Bill handed my mom the drawing. She told me the story of how it became and I found it rather interesting. I love old things especially with a story, so I had to find out about this Bill. Thank you for this story. Now I can tell the whole story when someone asks about the drawing. The drawing was drawn on a harts bread paper which raised my curiosity of why was it drawn on that paper...now I know the whole story. Thank you.

missy more than 1 year ago

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Vance Lauderdale

Ask Vance is the blog of Vance Lauderdale, the award-winning columnist of Memphis magazine and Inside Memphis Business. Vance is the author of four books: Ask Vance: The Best Questions and Answers from Memphis Magazine’s History and Trivia Expert (2003), as well as Ask Vance: More Questions and Answers from Memphis Magazine’s History Expert (2011), Vance Lauderdale’s Lost Memphis (2013), and Vance Lauderdale’s More Lost Memphis (2014). He is also the recipient of quite a few nice awards (including “Best Blog - 2017” from the Society of Professional Journalists Green Eyeshade Awards), the creator of several eye-catching wall calendars, and the only person we know with a vintage shock-treatment machine in his den.

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